Cultivate Christchurch -Bailey Peryman and the Red Zone

Bailey Peryman and Margaret Jefferies introduced me on 22 October to Cultivate Christchurch’s market gardening work with young people….helping Christchurch feed itself. Bailey described the 1000 or so acre Red Zone in the middle of the city, which was leveled by the 2011 earthquake, and which went liquid. Unsuitable for building on, the Red Zone would be ideal for food growing,  parks and for social and cultural facilities. Yet in 7 years, no decisions have been made….so the community and civil society might take the initiative? Have a look at Bailey’s short video about his work, and also his podcast on Steven Moe’s itunes site below….

Facebook: CultivateChristchurch

www.cultivate.org.nz

Short video about Cultivate Christchurch

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Building a People’s Agenda for Aotearoa

ActionStation are organising thousands of New Zealanders to come together for conversations about the future of Aotearoa over kai (food).

This process might work for the UK for a vision we need to build as an alternative to walking off the Brexit cliff?

We believe in working together to create what we cannot achieve alone: a society, economy and democracy that works for all of us – everyday people and the planet we love.

ActionStation is a place for people of all backgrounds to come together independent of party politics and the other labels that divide us. We’re excited to invite you to take a seat at the table for a conversation about our shared future.

From June – September, thousands of New Zealanders will gather together for Kai & Kōrero events. Over food we’ll discuss some of the big questions and dive deep into the dreams, aspirations and challenges facing New Zealand.

You can host a Kai & Kōrero with friends and whānau, or you can host a Kai & Kōrero with strangers and acquaintances – it’s totally up to you!

We believe meaningful conversation over food can spark real and lasting change. As much as possible, we’re encouraging people to come together over dinner, but your Kai & Kōrero event could be as a simple as a cup of tea and a biscuit, or hot chips and a beer in a pub.

If you don’t want to cook, but you still want to host, you can also organise for your Kai & Kōrero meal to be held at your favourite café, restaurant or pub. You can host it in your workplace over a morning tea, or as part of a Church or marae group gathering.

While food is a critical element in making people feel comfortable, it’s the conversation that matters most.

After your Kai & Kōrero event, we will gather the insights from these conversations with a quick post-event survey of all attendees. This will form the basis for to create a People’s Agenda for Aotearoa, combining our shared values and vision for this country with clear policies and actions that will get us there.

Kai and Korero Process: https://kaiandkorero.com/

Host guide : ActionStation: http://www.actionstation.org.nz/

 

For the Love Of Bees: Auckland

Sarah Smuts Kennedy, an inspiring social artist, introduced me at a breathtaking pace to the ‘For The Love of Bees’, a bee social sculptural project that is animating bee life in Auckland. We went to the Bee School at the historic Campbell Free kindergarten at Victoria Park. This is a carbon reducing, biological and community art project to strengthen inner city living conditions for humans and our long suffering bee population.

ART BUZZ: Art buzz: Sarah Smuts-Kennedy and Taarati Taiaroa.

Sarah Smuts Kennedy and Taarati Taiaroa

For The Love Of Bees is a living social sculpture that imagines Auckland as the safest city in the world for bees. Our project offers opportunities for businesses, students, individuals, schools, community gardens, brand partners and beekeepers to collaborate and produce a vision that will live on through the city of Auckland for years to come. By working in collaboration with Auckland Council Parks and Activate Auckland we are creating an ecosystem that supports thriving beehive colonies by introducing hives and focusing on the quality and quantity of flowers throughout our city. Sarah animated a wide-ranging conversation, inviting a young teenage beekeeper along to teach children about bees, talking about the developing OMG partnership with  CRL over leasing a ‘waste’ lot for a bee garden, education and organic pocket park, explaining the biodynamic peppering approach to deterring slugs and snails-and more included . Questions explored the scarcity of organic and biodynamic produce in NZ, how NZ communal land needed re-imagining, ‘some land is never owned’.;land access for gardening, allotments and community gardens and Maori views of the very notion of ‘ownership’ being problematic..guardian, or custodianship better?How to introduce more profound biological knowledge? How to rebuild models  of collaborative action, and support others initiatives, but in a linked up way.

Commoning – perspectives on conviviality – Farm Hack

Commoning – perspectives on conviviality – Farm Hack

‘On commoning and the commons

Commoning is a social practice within a framework set by the commons as a structure and common arrangement. The commons can be seen as the foundation of a convivialist society, commoning as its living expression. Hence commons are not goods even though they are often described as such. And goods are not commons because of their “natural” properties but because we treat them as such. Therefore we can essentially describe the commons as an institutionalised, legal, and infrastructural arrangement for a practice – commoning – in which we collaboratively organise and take responsibility for the use, maintenance and production of diverse resources.  The rules of commoning are (ideally) set by equal peers whose needs are at the focus of a shared process. Opportunities for individual growth and self-development are combined with the search for shared solutions, meaningful activities with extended and deepened relationships, and the creation of material abundance with the care for others and for nature. Living together like this was and still is practised to various degrees all over the world. In the process, commoning has to be repeatedly scrutinised, updated and rehearsed in order to remain embedded in every day life. This can never be taken for granted, and needs a suitable framework which currently we can rarely find.

Common wealth

The results of commoning traditionally consist of the sustainable use of natural resources such as forests, water or soil. For example this is the case with irrigation systems for which the people affected (commoners) give themselves rules for the shared use that enable a long-term fulfilment of needs (irrigation of fields, protection of water quality etc.). At the same time commoning can serve as the basis for the creation of something new: knowledge, hardware, software, food or a roof over the head. Basically there is nothing that cannot be thought of and designed as a commons. In the end our perspective may be to even view human society itself as the shared good – as our Common Wealth – which we have to make our own in practise and shape together according to our needs. In the end our perspective may be to even view human society itself as the shared good – as our Common Wealth – which we have to make our own in practise and shape together according to our needs. However, at present, humanity seems to be very distant from this perspective.’

Commoning – perspectives on conviviality